Banner graphic for She-philosopher.com: Studies in the history of science, technology & culture

First Published:  March 2005
Revised (substantive):  17 September 2014

pointer

A Note on fair use of visual and verbal content in the She-philosopher.com Gallery: She-philosopher.com GALLERY facsimiles and exhibits are not to be used for any purpose other than individual and/or group study, scholarship, and research, in accord with the Fair Use provisions of U.S. copyright law. Suggested citation formats are given on the Conditions of Use page.

She-philosopher.com Gallery images are organized by posting date, with new items added at the end of the Catalog. The multi-page HTML Catalog is supplemented by a separate Subject Index on the top-level Gallery page, with a summary list of subject index Categories here. Click/tap on any image thumbnail in the Gallery Catalog to access the exhibit in which it is included.

She-philosopher.com GALLERY CATALOG pages:
PAGE 1  (Cat. Nos. 1–20)  |  PAGE 2  (Cat. Nos. 21–40)  |  PAGE 3  (Cat. Nos. 41–60)  |
PAGE 4  (Cat. Nos. 61–80)  |  PAGE 5  (Cat. Nos. 81–100)  |  PAGE 6  (Cat. Nos. 101–120) |
PAGE 7  (Cat. Nos. 121–140) |  PAGE 8  (Cat. Nos. 141–160)

 

gallery catalog  (continued)


 
  thumbnail
 

CAT. 41.  Robert Hooke (1635–1703). Portable camera obscura, or “small picture-box.” Hooke’s design dates from the early 1660s, and was manufactured by Anthony Thompson (fl. 1638, ob. 1665), collaborating with Richard Reeves (aka Reeve, Reives; fl. 1649–1679). Prince Rupert (1619–1682), Count Palatine of the Rhine, bought one of Hooke’s cameras c.1665, as had Balthazar de Monconys (1611–1665), who purchased his camera from Thompson when visiting London in 1663.
     Facsimile of Hooke’s original sketch for his paper, “An instrument of use to take the draught or picture of any thing,” delivered to the Royal Society, 19 Dec. 1694. First printed in Philosophical experiments and observations of the late eminent Dr. Robert Hooke, S.R.S. and geom. prof. Gresh. and other eminent virtuoso’s in his time. With copper plates. Publish’d by W. Derham, F.R.S. London: Printed by W. and J. Innys, printers to the Royal Society, at the west end of St. Paul’s, MDCCXXVI [1726]. 292–296.

   
thumbnail
 

CAT. 42.  Peter Lely (1618–1680). Portrait painting of Charles I (1600–1649), king of England, with his second son, James (1633–1701), duke of York. Called the Clouded Majesty picture, from Lovelace’s poem on it, which begins “See! what a clouded Majesty!”. 1647.
     Facsimile of original painting in the collection at Syon House. Painted for Algernon Percy, the 10th earl of Northumberland, when three of the king’s children were in his charge, and the king was under house arrest at Hampton Court. Oil on canvas, 49.75 x 57.75 in.

 
   
thumbnail
 

CAT. 43.  William Rogers (fl. 1584–1604), after a drawing by Isaac Oliver (c.1565–1617). Engraved portrait of Elizabeth I (1533–1603), queen of England, shown three-quarter length. Later state of a plate (dating to about 1595-1600) that was originally a full-length of Queen Elizabeth. Captioned: “Th’ admired Empresse through the worlde applauded” etc. 1603–1618.
     Facsimile of original portrait print, 15.25 x 10.25 in. Published with the combined imprint of John Sudbury & George Humble, and sold at the Sign of the White Horse, Popes Head Alley in Cornhill.

 
   
thumbnail
 

CAT. 44.  Renold Elstrack (aka Reginald or Reginold Elstracke, Elstrack; b. 1570, d. in or after 1625). Engraved double portrait of James I (1566–1625) and Anne of Denmark (1574–1619), king and queen of England. Signed: “R: Elstrak sculp.” 1603–1616.
     Facsimile of original portrait print, 10.125 x 7.75 in. Published with the combined imprint of John Sudbury & George Humble, and sold at the Sign of the White Horse, Popes Head Alley in Cornhill.

 
   
thumbnail
 

CAT. 45.  Sir Anthony Van Dyck (1599–1641). Portrait of Charles I (1600–1649), king of England. 1636.
     Facsimile of original oil painting.

   
thumbnail
 

CAT. 46.  Elias Ashmole (1617–1692). Regalia of the Order of the Garter. Engraved by Wenceslaus Hollar (1607–1677). 1672.
     Facsimile of engraved plate from Ashmole’s The institution, laws & ceremonies of the most noble Order of the Garter. Collected and digested into one body by Elias Ashmole of the Middle-Temple Esq; Windesor Herald at Arms. A work furnished with a variety of matter, relating to honor and noblesse. London: Printed by J. Macock, for Nathanael Brooke ..., 1672.

 
   
thumbnail
 

CAT. 47.  Peter Lely (1618–1680). Portrait of Charles II (1630–1685), king of England. c.1675.
     Facsimile of original oil painting.

 
   
thumbnail
 

CAT. 48.  Mezzotint of Charles II (1630–1685), king of England. Unknown mezzotinter, after painting by Peter Lely (1618–1680). Late-17th century.
     Facsimile of original portrait print (approx. 14 x 10 in.), published by Richard Tompson.

 
   
thumbnail
 

CAT. 49.  Portrait of Charles II (1630–1685), king of England. Attributed to Thomas Hawker (b. before 1641?, d. in or after 1721?). c.1680.
     Facsimile of original oil painting.

 
   
thumbnail
 

CAT. 50.  Chinese kanji (“Ting”) representing the verb to listen. The Chinese logogram captures the difference between simply hearing and truly listening: “By integrating representations of not only our ears but of our eyes, our heart, and the selfless act of undivided attention, the Chinese have truly captured the essence of listening.”
     Facsimile of Listen artwork for January page of 2002 Peace Calendar from the Syracuse Cultural Workers. Design by Karen Kerney, SCW © 2001. Concept from Dan Wilkins of The Nth Degree.

   
thumbnail
 

CAT. 51.  Georgius de Sepibus (fl. 1678). Engraved title page, depicting the main hall of Kircher’s celebrated Musæum. 1678.
     Facsimile of printed image in Romani Collegii Societatus Jesu Musæum celeberrimum, cuius magnum antiquariæ rei, statuarum imaginum, picturarumque partem. Ex legato Alphonsi Domini, S.P.Q.R. a secretis, munificâ liberalitate relictum. P. Athanasius Kircherus Soc. Jesu, novis & raris inventis locupletatum, compluriumque principum curiosis donariis magno rerum apparatu instruxit; innumeris insuper rebus ditatum, ad plurimorum, maxime exterorum, curiositatisque doctrinæ avidorum instantiam urgentesque preces novis compluribusque machinis, tum peregrinis ex Indiis allatis rebus publicæ luci votisque exponit Georgius de Sepibus. Amstelodami: Ex Officina Janssonio-Wæsbergiana Anno MDCLXXVIII.

 
   
thumbnail
 

CAT. 52.  Map of North America, Atlantic coast (aka the “Velasco Map”). The original (no longer extant) was drawn in 1610 for England’s James I and the Virginia Company, and a pirated copy sent to Spain’s Philip III by Don Alonso de Velasco (Ambassador from Spain to the court of London, 1610–13) in an enciphered letter dated 22 March 1611. The English surveyor by whom the original map of 1610 was made is unknown; Captains Robert Tyndall or Nathaniel Powell, and the “well-known chart- or ‘plat’-maker” John Daniell, have all been suggested. Several scholars now believe that “the Velasco Map” is a fake. ?1610.
     Facsimile of the MS. map held by the Archivo General de Simancas, Valladolid, Spain, copied by Velasco c.1611. First printed in black and white (approx. 30" x 21¾") in 1890 by Alexander Brown as item CLVIII in vol. I of The Genesis of the United States. A narrative of the movement in England, 1605–1616, which resulted in the plantation of North America by Englishmen, disclosing the contest between England and Spain for the possession of the soil now occupied by the United States of America; set forth through a series of historical manuscripts now first printed together with a reissue of rare contemporaneous tracts, accompanied by bibliographical memoranda, notes, and brief biographies. Collected, arranged, and edited by Alexander Brown. 1890; rpt. New York: Russell & Russell, 1964.

 
   
thumbnail
 

CAT. 53.  Portrait of James I (1566–1625), king of England from 1603. Engraved by Thomas Woolnoth (1785–af.1836), after Paul van Somer (aka Vansommer) the elder (1577/8–1621/2). Early-19th century.
     Facsimile of portrait engraving reprod. as frontispiece to Vol. I, The Genesis of the United States, by Alexander Brown. 1890; rpt. New York: Russell & Russell, 1964.

 
   
thumbnail
 

CAT. 54.  Portrait of Philip III (1578–1621), king of Spain from 1598. After an engraving by John Ogborne (1755–1837), “from the original painting by Boizet.” 1890; rpt. 1897.
     Facsimile of portrait engraving reprod. on p. 78 of Vol. I, Old Virginia and Her Neighbours (1897), by John Fiske, who adds Philip’s autograph as printed in Manoscritos Españoles. Fiske’s copy of Ogborne’s original is from the earlier reproduction given on pg. xviii of Vol. I, The Genesis of the United States (1890), by Alexander Brown.
     Ogborne’s print was perhaps first published c.1812 by John Stockdale (c.1749–1814).

 
   
thumbnail
 

CAT. 55.  “Velasco Map” of 1610/11, showing the North American Atlantic coast from Newfoundland to Virginia (including the south coast of Labrador, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, the territory surrounding the St. Lawrence as far as the Great Lakes, Maine, New England, New York, and New Jersey). The English surveyor by whom the original map of 1610 was made is unknown; Captains Robert Tyndall or Nathaniel Powell, and the “well-known chart- or ‘plat’-maker” John Daniell, have all been suggested. Several scholars now believe that “the Velasco Map” is a fake. ?1610/11.
     Facsimile of the MS. map held by the Archivo General de Simancas, Valladolid, Spain, copied by Velasco c.1611. First modern printing in color (photo-intaglio reproduction, approx. 13" x 9½") in 1916 by Isaac Newton Phelps Stokes as the frontispiece (Plate C.22) for section I of vol. II of The Iconography of Manhattan Island, 1498–1909. 1916; rpt. New York: Arno Press, [1967].

   
thumbnail
 

CAT. 56.  Detail of section delineating Captain Henry Hudson’s discoveries as portrayed on the “Velasco Map.” ?1610/11.
     Facsimile of the MS. map held by the Archivo General de Simancas, Valladolid, Spain, copied by Velasco c.1611. Printed in grayscale (approx. 5½" x 7½") in 1916 by Isaac Newton Phelps Stokes as Plate C.22A in vol. II of The Iconography of Manhattan Island, 1498–1909. 1916; rpt. New York: Arno Press, [1967].

 
   
thumbnail
 

CAT. 57.  The Virginia Company Chart, an English MS. chart of the Atlantic coasts of America from Newfoundland to Brazil, and of Europe and Africa from Ireland to the Coast of Guinea. Produced by an unknown source, the chart shows the first English settlements on the soil of the United States, and has been described as the earliest known map to both delineate and name Cape Cod, as well as Whitsonsbay and Sagadahoc. 1606–08.
     Facsimile of MS. chart in the Stokes collection, drawn in gold and colours on vellum and mounted on a roller, measuring 20 by 26 centimeters.
     Reproduced for the first time (nearly full size, at approx. 12½" x 7¼") in 1916 by Isaac Newton Phelps Stokes as Plate C.21A in vol. II of The Iconography of Manhattan Island, 1498–1909. 1916; rpt. New York: Arno Press, [1967].

 
   
thumbnail
 

CAT. 58.  “Velasco Map” of 1610/11, showing the east coast of North America from Cape Fear to Labrador. The English surveyor by whom the original map of 1610 was made is unknown; Captains Robert Tyndall or Nathaniel Powell, and the “well-known chart- or ‘plat’-maker” John Daniell, have all been suggested. Several scholars now believe that “the Velasco Map” is a fake. ?1610/11.
     Facsimile of the MS. map held by the Archivo General de Simancas (Estado Leg. 2588, fo. 22), Valladolid, Spain, copied by Velasco c.1611. Modern color reproduction (approx. 15.3 x 11 in.), Fig. 326, pp. 266–7 in William P. Cumming, R. A. Skelton, and D. B. Quinn, The Discovery of North America. 1971; New York: American Heritage Press, 1972.

 
   
thumbnail
 

CAT. 59.  Detail of legend (“All the blue is dune by the relations of the Indians.”) from the “Velasco Map.” ?1610/11.
     Facsimile of the MS. map held by the Archivo General de Simancas, Valladolid, Spain, copied by Velasco c.1611. Modern grayscale reproduction (approx. 6½" x 5¼"), Fig. 51, p. 140 in Mark Warhus, Another America: Native American Maps and the History of Our Land. New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1997.

 
   
thumbnail
 

CAT. 60.  Peter Paul Rubens (1577–1640). Portrait of Thomas Howard (1585/6–1646), earl of Arundel, as the consummate cavalier (“an imperious image for an autocratic age”). c.1630.
     Facsimile of original art. Brush and brown and black ink, brown and gray wash heightened with white, with touches of red.

       
       
 

Gallery Catalog Pages:   1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 |

 

next pointer

go to TOP of page

up a level: She-philosopher.com GALLERY page